julia nutter

Here is my internet presence. I work on the Maddow show. Former WRSU Chief Announcer and DJ, proud Rutgers U. grad, c/o 2010. Past life as a character actor, once on the off-off-Broadway stage.

kellysue:

fyrechild83:

Yay my Captain Marvel doll came! :-D

http://ilikecomicstoo.storenvy.com

WANT NOW. 

kellysue:

fyrechild83:

Yay my Captain Marvel doll came! :-D

http://ilikecomicstoo.storenvy.com

WANT NOW. 

When The Observer began, it was intended to be a hyperlocal Manhattan affair. In light of what it later became, its early tone and purview — community board meetings loomed somewhat large in its coverage — seem almost bucolic.

Esteemed as a mentor to writers, Mr. Kaplan, by all accounts, helped usher in a delectable dose of snark.

—   

Peter Kaplan, Editor of New York Observer, Dies at 59 

Source: http://www.nytimes.com/2013/12/01/nyregion/peter-kaplan-who-brought-a-cutting-edge-to-the-new-york-observer-dies-at-59.html?hp&_r=1&

wolverxne:

You’ve been snapped!! by: Dana Allen - False Bay, Cape Town, South Africa

These stunning pictures captures the moment a great white shark leaps out of the water clutching a seal in its mouth.The amazing picture of the great white was taken by Dana Allen, 50, in False Bay, off Cape Town in South Africa. The photographer captured the shark in mid-air hovering above the water with a ‘fake’ seal in its mouth. Mr Allen’s team spent three days trying to set up the amazing shots by using a rubber ‘decoy’ seal to tempt the sharks out. by: Leon Watson

(via motherjones)

WRSU report on campus interest in the 2008 presidential election

WRSU report, Summer 2008

A report on Gov. Corzine’s visit to Rutgers University. 

msnbc:

MSNBC hosts share what they are most thankful for this holiday season.
To see more, click here. 

msnbc:

MSNBC hosts share what they are most thankful for this holiday season.

To see more, click here. 

theatlantic:

The Only Person Who Knew Both Kennedy and His Killer

The 50th anniversary of John F. Kennedy’s assassination has drawn all manner of retrospectives. But for one woman, the memory of tuning in to the news coverage is particularly poignant. Priscilla Johnson McMillan is the only person who knew both President Kennedy and his killer.
McMillan worked for Kennedy on Capitol Hill in the mid-1950s, when he was a U.S. Senator, advising him on foreign policy matters. She then moved into journalism and in 1959 was stationed in the Soviet Union, reporting for The Progressive and the North American Newspaper Alliance. It was there that she met a 20-year-old American called Lee Harvey Oswald. He was staying in her hotel while trying to defect to the Soviet Union.
McMillan interviewed him. Oswald proceeded to critique the American system and informed her that he was a follower of Karl Marx. “I saw,” he said, explaining why he left the U.S., “that I would become either a worker exploited for capitalist profit or an exploiter or, since there are many in this category, I’d be one of the unemployed.” On that night in Moscow, Oswald also told McMillan that he had a life mission: “I want to give the people of the United States something to think about.”
Four years later, on the night of November 22, as McMillan followed news coverage of the assassination in Dallas from Cambridge, Massaschusetts, charges began to emerge that Oswald was responsible for shooting Kennedy. McMillan was astonished. “My God,” she said, “I know that boy!”
Read more.

theatlantic:

The Only Person Who Knew Both Kennedy and His Killer

The 50th anniversary of John F. Kennedy’s assassination has drawn all manner of retrospectives. But for one woman, the memory of tuning in to the news coverage is particularly poignant. Priscilla Johnson McMillan is the only person who knew both President Kennedy and his killer.

McMillan worked for Kennedy on Capitol Hill in the mid-1950s, when he was a U.S. Senator, advising him on foreign policy matters. She then moved into journalism and in 1959 was stationed in the Soviet Union, reporting for The Progressive and the North American Newspaper Alliance. It was there that she met a 20-year-old American called Lee Harvey Oswald. He was staying in her hotel while trying to defect to the Soviet Union.

McMillan interviewed him. Oswald proceeded to critique the American system and informed her that he was a follower of Karl Marx. “I saw,” he said, explaining why he left the U.S., “that I would become either a worker exploited for capitalist profit or an exploiter or, since there are many in this category, I’d be one of the unemployed.” On that night in Moscow, Oswald also told McMillan that he had a life mission: “I want to give the people of the United States something to think about.”

Four years later, on the night of November 22, as McMillan followed news coverage of the assassination in Dallas from Cambridge, Massaschusetts, charges began to emerge that Oswald was responsible for shooting Kennedy. McMillan was astonished. “My God,” she said, “I know that boy!”

Read more.

onthecredenza:

Buffalo chicken, sausage and cheese pizza for dinner.

onthecredenza:

Buffalo chicken, sausage and cheese pizza for dinner.

todaysdocument:

"To the People of the Trans-Miss. Department"
The Confederacy depended on enslaved people to build fortifications, cook, drive supply wagons, work in hospitals, and produce munitions. Slave labor also planted and harvested many Southern crops, especially when white males were away fighting. The Union’s decision to emancipate, enlist, and arm black men was an enormous threat to Southern independence. This broadside urged owners to move their slaves away from the advancing Union Army and contribute their “servants” to the cause.

Broadside “To the People of the Trans-Miss. Department”, 09/15/1863.  From the War Department Collection of Confederate Records

via DocsTeach

todaysdocument:

"To the People of the Trans-Miss. Department"

The Confederacy depended on enslaved people to build fortifications, cook, drive supply wagons, work in hospitals, and produce munitions. Slave labor also planted and harvested many Southern crops, especially when white males were away fighting. The Union’s decision to emancipate, enlist, and arm black men was an enormous threat to Southern independence. This broadside urged owners to move their slaves away from the advancing Union Army and contribute their “servants” to the cause.

Broadside “To the People of the Trans-Miss. Department”, 09/15/1863.  From the War Department Collection of Confederate Records

via DocsTeach